Friday, December 30, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - YWCA Health Club


In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.

“OFFICERS OF Y. W. C. A. HEALTH CLUB


—Banner Staff Photo.

Members of the various classes in the health education department of the Y. W. C. A. recently organized a Business Girls' Health Club. The offices, reading from left to right, are: Mrs. Martha Holton, president; Mrs. Mary Parrish, second-vice president; Miss Evelyn Stark, membership chairman; Mrs. Thelma Moody, secretary-treasurer; Miss Myrtle Jones, publicity chairman, and Miss Dessa F. Ainlay, adviser of the club and director of the department. Miss Mary Sherer, first vice-president, is not in the picture.”



[The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.]


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - YWCA Girls' Basketball Team

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


"Y. W. C. A.  GIRLS HAVE FIGHTING CAGE TEAM


—Banner staff photos.

Pictured above is the Y. W. C. A. House girls' basketball team which is a member of the Y. W. C. A. Business Girls' League. The team got off to a bad start but has been displaying some fine basketball in its recent games and are looking forward to a great season next year.

The players are, reading left to right: Peggy Harris, Myrtle Jones, Maude James, Nancy Brandon, manager; Louise Kerr, Louise McDonald, Gladys Freeman, Minnie Marshall, captain, and Mrs. Robert Parrish, coach."


[The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.]

© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, December 26, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Ann Gay Webb

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


 “Ann Gay Webb”

Notes:
  1. Ann Gay Webb, age 3 and 1/12, is enumerated in the 1930 census in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, with her parents, Robert S. and Mary Webb, and brother Robert, Jr., age 8. Also enumerated in the household is Sarah Keele, age 60, widowed, listed as mother. [Source: 1930 U.S. census, Davidson County, Tennessee, population schedule, Nashville, Enumeration District (ED) 72, p. 11-A, dwelling 193, family 194, Robert S. Webb; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Dec 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2242.]
  2. The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.
  3. The relationship between Ann Gay Webb and her parents and Laurine Wyatt is unknown.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, December 23, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Virginia Kathrine Winn

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.

  
“Virginia Kathrine Winn, of Miami, Fla., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Turner Winn, and granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Wyatt, of this city.”


Notes:
  1. Andrew T. Winn, his wife Ermina, daughter Virginia, and brother-in-law Garner Wyatt are found in the 1930 census in Miami, Dade County, Florida; all are reported as being born in Tennessee. Virginia is reported to be 5 years old. [Source: 1930 U.S. census, Dade County, Florida, population schedule, Miami, Enumeration District (ED) 12, p. 3-A, dwelling 78, family 78, Andrew T. Winn; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Dec 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 308.]
  2. The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.
  3. Virginia Katherine Winn married Prentice Walton Smith in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, on April 28, 1943; click here to see the news clipping announcing the marriage.
  4. The relationship between Virginia Kathrine Winn and her parents and Laurine Wyatt is unknown. However, Virginia’s mother was a Wyatt so likely there is some familial relationship.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Charles Morris Burk

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


 “Charles Morris Burk, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Burk, Nashville; grandson of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Burk and C. W. Head.”
  
Notes:
  1. Robert A. Burk and Eloise Head were married 17 October 1925 in Williamson County, Tennessee. [Source: “Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002,” Burk-Head (1925); online database with images, Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Dec 2011).]
  2. Robert A. and Ellise Head are found in the 1930 census in Nashville, Tennessee; there are no children in the household. [Source: 1930 U.S. census, Davidson County, Tennessee, population schedule, Nashville, Enumeration District (ED) 214, p. 11-A, dwelling 218, family 237, Robert A. Burk; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Dec 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2244.]
  3. The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.
  4. Any relationship between Charles Morris Burk and his parents and Laurine Wyatt is unknown.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, December 19, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Ann Elizabeth Derryberry

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


"Ann Elizabeth Derryberry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer T. Derryberry, Nashville."
 Notes:
  1. Ann E. Derryberry is found in the 1930 U.S. federal census enumerated with her parents Homer T. and Grace B. Derryberry in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee. She is reported as being 6 years of age, born in Tennessee. [Source: 1930 U.S. census, Davidson County, Tennessee, population schedule, Nashville, Enumeration District (ED) 181, p. 4-B, dwelling 43, family 56, Homer T. Derryberry; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Dec 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2242.]
  2. The name of the newspaper in which this photograph appeared and the date of publication are unknown.
  3. Any relationship between Ann Derryberry or her parents and Laurine Wyatt is unknown.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, December 16, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of James Alvin Brown and Nadine Bottoms


In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.

  
“Lawrenceburg Bride

“Lawrenceburg, Tenn., June 1 (Spl.)--Mrs. James Alvin Brown was Miss Nadine Marjorie Bottoms, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Bottoms of Lawrenceburg, before her marriage in Franklin, Tenn., on May 19. Mrs. Brown is a member of the Girl's Cotillion, and the Girl's A. B. C. Club.”

I found the following marriage record for Alvin Brown and Nadine Battams in Williamson County, Tennessee, on May 19, 1940:

Source: Ancestry.com. Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. Original data: Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm.

Notes:
  1. Nadine Bottoms was born about 1919 and is enumerated with her parents and siblings on the 1920 and 1930 U.S. federal censuses, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and Lawrence County, Tennessee, respectively.
  2. This announcement was on the back of a loose newspaper clipping in the scrapbook. Therefore, I do not believe this person was affiliated in any way with Laurine Wyatt.
  3. I have no information regarding the date of publication of this announcement or the name of the newspaper in which it appeared.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Mrs. John Ulna Whitaker Returns to Nashville

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


 Mrs. John Ulna Whitaker
Photo by W. G. Thuss

“Mr. and Mrs. John Ulna Whitaker, who have been making their home in Detroit since their marriage on Christmas Day, have returned to Nashville to reside and will make their home on Cahal avenue. Mrs. Whitaker was formerly Miss Myrtle Frogue, charming young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Frogue.”
  
Notes:
  1. Myrtle Frogue is enumerated with her parents and siblings in the 1900-1920 U.S. federal censuses, first in Smith County, Tennessee, then in Davidson County, Tennessee. According to a family tree posted on Ancestry, she and John Ulna Whitaker were married on December 25, 1927, in Nashville; however, I have been unable to locate a marriage record for the couple on either Ancestry or FamilySearch. The couple is enumerated in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, in 1930. According to the Social Security Death Index, Myrtle Whitaker was born on 13 January 1898 and died in November 1984.
  2. I have no information regarding the date of publication of this announcement or the name of the newspaper in which it appeared.
  3. I have no information regarding Myrtle Frogue Whitaker’s relationship to Laurine Wyatt.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, December 12, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Engagement of Ora Beverly Goss and Lucian Leonard Davis

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


Miss Ora Beverly Goss
photo by Calvert Bros.

The engagement of Miss Ora Beverly Goss to Lucian Leonard Davis, of St. Louis, Mo., is announced today by the bride-elect's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Franklin Goss of this city. The wedding will take place the latter part of November.”



Notes:
1.  UPDATED: Ora Beverly Goss and Lucian L. Davis were married 29 November 1928 in Davidson County, Tennessee. [Source: Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950, online database, entry for Ora Beverly Goss and Lucion L. Davis; FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 9 February 2012).]
2.     The date of publication and the title of the newspaper in which this announcement appeared are unknown; searches made on NewspaperArchives and GenealogyBank.
3.     The relationship of Laurine Wyatt to this couple is unknown.


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, December 9, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of Mary Edna Lee and Lawrence Glenn Foust

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“Miss Mary Edna Lee Becomes Bride of Lawrence Glenn Foust In Quiet Ceremony

Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Lee of Clarksville announce the marriage of their daughter, Mary Edna, to Lawrence Glenn Foust, son of Mrs. L. C. Foust of Sango. The wedding took place at the First Baptist Church in Clarksville at 7 o'clock the evening of March 26. The Rev. Richard N. Owen performed the ceremony.

For the occasion the bride was attractive in a two-piece beige suit with patent leather accessories. Her flowers were talisman roses. Mrs. Walter Gray, sister of the groom, serving as attendant, chose an outfit of Navy blue with white accessories. Her flowers were Briarcliff roses.

Walter Gray was best man.

Only a few close friends of the family attended the wedding.

Mrs. Foust is a graduate of Clarksville High School and attended Austin Peay State College for two years. She has been with Boillin-Harrison Co. here for several years. Mr. Foust is a graduate of Clarksville High School and is now engaged in farming.”


Notes:
  1. No marriage record for this couple could be found on Ancestry.com or FamilySearch.
  2. The date of publication and the title of the newspaper in which this announcement appeared are unknown; searches made on NewspaperArchives and GenealogyBank.
  3. The relationship of Laurine Wyatt to this couple is unknown.




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Blog Caroling with footnoteMaven

One of my favorite traditional Christmas carols is What Child Is This? Enjoy this rendition by The Moody Blues:




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

In Memoriam

Photo of Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor,
taken March 2002 by 
Stan Shebs

In remembrance of those who lost their lives
December 7, 1941

A full list of those who died as a result of the attack on Pearl Harbor can be found here.




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, December 5, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of Virginia Katherine Winn and Prentice Walton Smith

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“MRS. PRENTICE WALTON SMITH

“Mrs. Prentice Walton Smith, who before her marriage, April 28, 1943, was Miss Virginia Katherine Winn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Turner Winn of Clarksville.

“The wedding took place in Hopkinsville, Ky.”


Notes:
  1. The date of publication and the newspaper in which this announcement appeared are unknown.
  2. The relationship of Laurine Wyatt to the subject of the article is also unknown.



 © 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, December 2, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Mrs. William S. Spangenberg Honored

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“Mrs. W. S. Spangenberg Is Honoree of Affair

“Mrs. William S. Spangenberg, a popular bride, was the honoree of an informal party Friday evening when Mrs. William Blount and Miss Louise McDonald entertained at the home of Mrs. Blount on Fifteenth Avenue, South.

“Contests were the diversion of the evening, prized being awarded Miss Dorothy Brooks and Mrs. Marshall Spangenberg. The honoree was presented a number of gifts, the presentation being made by little Caroline Murphy.

“Late in the evening refreshments were served. The cutting of a decorated bride's cake was a feature. The guests were: Misses Carobelle Murphy, Louise Kerr, Myrtle Jones, Mary Parrish, Evelyn Stark, Mrs. Jerry Dale, Miss Camille Binkley, Mrs. Florine Duncan Powers, Miss Lillian Kinsolving, Mrs. Marshall Spangenberg, Miss Frances Turner, Mrs. Joe B. Williams, Miss Thelma Green, Mrs. Virginia Sexton, Mrs. Williams Harlon, Miss Dorothy Brooks, Miss Laura Van Trease, Mrs. Weaver Harris, Miss Dessa Fay Ainlay, Miss Ruby McQuire, Miss Gertrude Brown, Mrs. Sophia Bender, Mrs. H. T. Ammerman of Chattanooga, Tenn., Miss Lorraine Hill, and Miss Peggy Zoller.”


Notes:
  1. The date of this announcement and the newspaper in which it was published are unknown.
  2. Although the middle initial in her name is different, I believe this article also refers to Nancy Lee (Brandon) Spangenberg whose marriage announcement was the topic of another post.
  3. The relationship between Laurine Wyatt and individuals mentioned in this article is unknown.


 © 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of W. L. Spangenberg and Nancy Lee Brandon

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“MARRIAGE ANNOUNCED

“MRS. W. L. SPANGENBERG'S marriage is announced today by her father, J.C. Brandon. The ceremony took place May 30, in Franklin, Ky. The bride, who was formerly Miss Nancy Lee Brandon, attended Abilene Christian College in Abilene, Texas, and David Lipscomb College. Mr. and Mrs. Spangenberg will make their home in Louisville where the bridegroom is an engineer and draftsman in the employ of the United States Government.”


Notes:
  1. The date of this announcement and the newspaper in which it was published are unknown.
  2. No marriage record was located in searches on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.
  3. However, a death certificate was found for a stillborn child born to this couple on 29 February 1936. [Source: Kentucky Bureau of Vital Statistics, death certificate, child of Wm. L. Spangenberg (1936); Ancestry.com, Kentucky Death Records, 1852-1953, online database and images (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 November 2011.]
  4. The relationship between Laurine Wyatt and this couple is unknown.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, November 28, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - YWCA Membership Campaign Committee

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.

This is another of the numerous articles and documents related to the Y.W.C.A. contained in the scrapbook.


  
"Y. W. C. A. Membership Campaign Committee

"–Banner Staff Photo.

"One of the committees working with enthusiasm for the Y. W. C. A. annual membership drive is the Business Women's Committee, of which Mrs. Weaver Harris serves as colonel. The campaign was launched Wednesday with a luncheon attended by 300 women. In the above group, reading from left to right, are, first row: Miss Callie May White, Miss Gertrude Miller, Miss Lorena Davis, Miss Mai Gregory, Miss Evelyn Stark, Mrs. Robert Parrish; second row: Miss Elizabeth McGregor, Miss Mamie Akin, Miss Margaret Kain, Mrs. Paul Cherry, Dr. Edna Pennington, Mrs. Emil Marugg; third row: Miss Rush Worley, Miss Katherine Morris, Miss Frances Beasley, Miss Ina Sherrebeck, Miss Alice McMahon, Miss Dessa Ainlay; top row: Miss Marie Hayes, Miss Fannie Rogers, and Mrs. Weaver Harris."

Note: It is likely this photo appeared in the Nashville (TN) Banner; however, the date of publication is unknown.


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, November 25, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - YWCA Officers and Directors


In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.

This is one of the numerous articles and documents related to the Y.W.C.A. contained in the scrapbook.



"Y. W. C. A. OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

"–Banner staff photo.

"Newly elected officers and members of the directorate of the Y. W. C. A. are shown above, the picture being made Wednesday morning at the bi-monthly meeting.

"Reading from the left, they are: first row—Mrs. George Blackie, treasurer; Mrs. J. S. McHenry, corresponding secretary; Mrs. John R. Aust, president; Mrs. T. Graham Hall, vice-president; and Miss Ina Scherrebeck, general secretary. Second row—Miss Rebecca Porter, Mrs. W. G. Ewing, Miss Louise Young, Mrs. J. H. McClure, Mrs. A. J. Dyer. Third row—Mrs. Brown Buford, Miss Susie McWhirter, Miss Katherine Dibrell, Mrs. Weaver Harris and Mrs. W. F. Powell. Mrs. L. G. Durr, vice-president, and Miss Jennie Spark, recording secretary, are absent from the picture."

Note: It is likely this photo appeared in the Nashville (TN) Banner; however, the date of publication is unknown.


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, November 21, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of Louise Gentry and Thomas MacWilliams

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“—Photo by Fletcher Harvey, Schumacher Studio

“MRS. THOMAS MacWILLIAMS was before her marriage May 19, Miss Louise Gentry of Una. Mr. MacWILLIAMS is continuity editor for Radio Station WSIX.”

Notes:
  1. Searches for this marriage on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org were unsuccessful.
  2. Relationship to Laurine Wyatt is unknown.




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Thanksgiving Edition


Randy Seaver of GeneaMusings has offered the following challenge for the Thanksgiving edition of SNGF:

Think about the answers to these questions:
  • Which ancestor are you most thankful for, and why?
  • Which author (book, periodical, website, etc.) are you most thankful for, and why?
  • Which historical record set (paper or website) are you most thankful for, and why?

Tell us about it in a blog post of your own; in a comment to this blog post; in a Facebook status line or a Google Plus stream post.


I am thankful for all my ancestors—without them, I wouldn’t be here!

But since I can only choose one for this exercise, I would have to choose my paternal great-grandfather, Ambrose B. Martindale (1844-1918). A.B. (as he was known) was active as a business and civic leader in the communities in which he lived. I have been able to find articles about him in the newspapers of the day, in addition to official records. Of all my ancestors, A.B. is the one who has truly come to life for me.

Hands down, Elizabeth Shown Mills is my favorite genealogy author and speaker. Before I ever heard of Evidence Explained, I read her historical novel Isles of Canes. Her QuickSheets provide a handy reference for writing basic source citations and analysis for problem solving. And I never pass on an opportunity to hear her speak at a genealogy conference!

Again, since I can only choose one historical record set, I am most thankful for the Civil War Service Records available on Fold3. The digitized images of NARA Publication M347 "Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records" available as part of this collection gave me the information I needed to prove a family tradition that A. B. Martindale had served in both the Confederate and Union armies!



Disclaimer: I am also thankful to have the opportunity to participate in several affiliate marketing programs! Should you decide to purchase any of the products listed above through my link, I will receive a small commission. The price you pay for the product will be the same whether you purchase through me or by going directly to the seller’s website.


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Marriage of Clifton C. Seale, Jr., and Ruth Lamb

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.



“—Photo by Cliff Eckstrom-Cain-Sloan Co.

“THEIR MARRIAGE ANNOUNCED TODAY—Mr. and Mrs. Clifton C. Seale, Jr., are seen following their marriage which was solemnized on Sunday, November 9, in the study at First Baptist Church. Dr. W. F. Powell, pastor of the church, officiated. The bride, who is a daughter of Mrs. James A. Lamb and the late Mr. Lamb, was formerly Miss Ruth Lamb. Mr. Seale is a son of Mrs. Bessie Seale of Nashville and Clifton C. Seale of Livingston, Ala. He and his bride will make their home at 1100 Fatherland Street.”

Notes:
  1. The title of the newspaper and the date of publication of this announcement are unknown.
  2. Searches for the marriage on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch were unsuccessful.
  3. Any relationship between these individuals and Laurine Wyatt is unknown.




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, November 14, 2011

Wyatt Scrapbook - Obituary of Frances Buchanan Bateman

In November 2011, I purchased a scrapbook at an antiques mall in Carson, California. The scrapbook is believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt. I am transcribing the articles and documents contained in the scrapbook with the hope that it may be of value to genealogists who may be researching the individuals named.


Following is one of the loose newspaper clippings that was included in the scrapbook believed to have belonged to Laurine Wyatt:


“Rites for Mrs. Bateman Scheduled Tomorrow

"Funeral services for Mrs. Frances Buchanan Bateman, for many years associated with the millinery department at Tinsley's store, who died yesterday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Lee Hanson, 2111 Bernard Avenue, will be held tomorrow morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Marshall Funeral Home. The Rev. J. J. Ferguson and the Rev. Harry Denman will officiate and burial will be in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.

"A native of Vicksburg, Miss., Mrs. Bateman lived there until her marriage, after which she made her home in Nashville. She was the widow of Willis Enoch Bateman who died in 1911.

"She was a charter member of the Rutledge Magazine Club and belonged to the Belmont Methodist Church.

"In addition to Mrs. Hanson, she is survived by her son, Willis Enoch Bateman, of Norfolk, Va.”

Notes:

  1. I have been unable to determine the title of the newspaper in which this obituary appeared.
  2. Frances Buchanan Bateman was born on 19 January 1880 and died 23 October 1941 in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of Samuel J. Buchanan and Mary Sherrard. [Source: “Tennessee Death Records, 1914-1955,” FamilySearch; digital images (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11571-125470-74?cc=1417505 : accessed 14 November 2011).]
  3. At this time, I am unable to determine what, if any, relationship existed between Mrs. Bateman and Laurine Wyatt.

© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Saturday, November 12, 2011

A Treasure Found!


While visiting the antiques mall in Carson yesterday, a friend found a wonderful old scrapbook. I couldn’t resist purchasing it! It appears to have belonged to a woman named Laurine Wyatt and includes items from about 1930 to 1945. There are no photographs, but quite a few newspaper clippings (undated and without the name of the newspaper), numerous items related to the YWCA of Nashville, Tennessee, and two letters of a personal nature. I’ll be scanning, transcribing and sharing the contents here over the next few weeks. Here is a photo of the scrapbook and of Laurine’s name from the inside of the front cover.





© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, November 7, 2011

I’ve Decided to Participate in NaNoWriMo!


NaNoWriMo, short for National Novel Writing Month, is sponsored by The Office of Letters and Light. The goal is for participants to write a 50,000-word novel during the month of November. While the challenge is to write a novel, there are rebels who are writing blog posts, memoirs, or historical non-fiction.

I’m one of those rebels. In addition to posts for four blogs, I have several writing projects lined up: a marriage record compilation, a diary transcription, a book about my mother’s ancestors, two short articles to submit for publication, and an entry for the Southern California Genealogical Society’s 12th Annual Family History Writing Contest. Whew!

You may be wondering if I expect to finish all those projects in the 23 days that are left in the month. Not really, but I hope to have a solid, working draft for each of them.

NaNoWriMo began on November 1st while I was vacationing in Texas. So I have a lot of catching up to do! So far, I’ve only written 772 words; I need to write 2,052 words a day for the rest of the month to reach 50,000 words. Wish me luck!



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Look It Up, Dear!

In honor of Noah Webster's birthday, today has been designated Dictionary Day!

Language is evolving constantly, so the words we encounter in records about our ancestors may be unfamiliar to us. Or we may find that the definition in use today is not the same as in past times!

A must-have in your genealogy library is Black's Law Dictionary. Although Black's is now in its 9th edition, the 4th edition is recommended because it contains terms genealogists may encounter that are now obsolete.

Another fun dictionary to have on the shelf is A to ZAX: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists & Historians, by Barbara Jean Evans. It includes words from many categories including occupational, household, and colloquial terms.

Whenever you encounter an unfamiliar word in historical documents, or a phrase seems unclear, remember your parents admonishment to "look it up, dear!"



Disclaimer: The links above lead to Amazon.com product pages. I am an Amazon affiliate, and should you purchase a book by following one of my links, I will receive a small commission. You pay the same price as if you visited Amazon independently.

© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Thursday, October 13, 2011

On Being a Better Ancestor - Diaries and Journals

Cover from public domain
copy book, Wikimedia Commons.
I don’t think there’s a genealogist alive that wouldn't love to find an ancestor's diary...to be able to read, in that person's own hand, their thoughts on day-to-day life, their dreams and aspirations, their frustrations and disappointments.

There’s been some discussion about journals on the blogs recently. It started with a New York Times article written by Dominique Browning, Burning the Diaries. Melissa Mannon shared her reaction to the article on Archives.com. Marian Pierre-Louis commented on Melissa’s post, and then posted Have You Ever Considered an Intentional Journal?


Here’s my take…

In The Artist's Way, Julia Cameron recommends writing daily morning pages—three handwritten pages of stream-of-consciousness writing—as a method to get rid of the junk that inhibits our creative spirit. Morning pages are not intended to be read by anyone, not even the writer, for at least several weeks and perhaps not at all.

I’ve written morning pages off and on for about ten years. They are filled with endless whining, grousing and complaining about work, relationships, family, etc., nothing of any value in telling my story.  It’s the same from day to day, from one year to the next. For me, the value of morning pages lies in their cathartic properties. I surely don’t want anyone to read them EVER! One of these days, I will take the time to shred them. I wish I had a fireplace because it would be so much quicker to burn them!

I don’t have the discipline to write an intentional journal, so I will continue to post short memoirs on my 52 Weeks of Personal History blog. (Having procrastinated for nine months, I am still getting caught up!) When the year is over, I plan to choose another set of prompts to use in continuing my life account.

Everyone has a story that should be told…choose a way that feels comfortable for you and tell yours!



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Monday, October 10, 2011

On Being a Better Ancestor - Memories


“Tell me about the olden days.” I can remember asking my parents to tell me what life was like when they were young. But now they are gone, and there are so many more questions I would like to ask.

Preserving memories is an important aspect of being a good ancestor. One of the methods that can be used is to write about them in blog posts. There are many resources available to use as writing prompts. Here are just a few:

I must confess I intended to start doing this at the beginning of the year, using Amy Coffin’s series. But I haven’t....and now must catch up! My plan is to write 7 posts per week including the prompt for the current week and several from previous weeks until I am back on track.

I’ve created a blog just for these posts—52 Weeks of Personal History—and published three posts. The posts are “dated” according to the week when the prompt was originally scheduled to be written. Once the year is over, my goal is to publish a “blog book” that can become part of my genealogy legacy.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Genealogy Database Statistics

Randy Seaver, of GeneaMusings, has posted this week's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun challenge:
Hey genea-philes - it's Saturday Night!  Time for more Genealogy Fun!

Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

1)  If you have your family tree research in a Genealogy Management Program (GMP), whether a computer software program or an online family tree, figure out how to find how many persons, places, sources, etc. are in your database (hint:  the Help button is your friend!).

2)  Tell us which GMP you use, and how many persons, places, sources, etc. are in your database(s) today in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blog post, or in a Facebook status or Google+ stream comment.
I use the Deluxe Version of Legacy Family Tree 7, which doesn't provide as many statistics as RootsMagic 4. The steps in Legacy are to click on HELP, and then on GENERAL INFORMATION; here are my results:




It shows that the version I am using has a build date of 2 Aug 2011; one of Legacy's features is that it will remind you to check for updates to the software. This is the most recent version.

Under File Information, you will note that the Family File Path shows that I have saved my database to My Dropbox. By saving it there, I can be sure that I have the most up-to-date information whether I open the database from my desktop computer or my laptop.

Finally, it gives some content information:

  • Number of individuals: 9,765
  • Number of families: 3,456
  • Unique surnames: 2,161
  • Master source entries: 921 (Of course, I have many more source citations! This just represents the number of master sources I am currently using.)

Here are some of the other reports available in Legacy, along with my current page count for each report:

  • Event Report: lists events for each individual (200 pages)
  • Source Citations Report: lists each master source with the number of times it is used (62 pages)
  • Surname Report: lists each surname with the number of occurrences (37 pages)
  • To Do Report: lists to-do items by individual (21 pages)

To save trees, I don't print ANY of these reports!


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, October 7, 2011

Friend of Friends Friday - Will of Alpheus Beal (Beall) 1833


While researching another family in Ohio County, West Virginia, I found the will of Alpheus Beal (Beall) written in 1833 which is transcribed below; copies of the images follow the transcription.

"Know all men by these presents that I Alpheus
Beal of Ohio County Farmer being weak in
body but of Sound mind and memory make
this my will and testament as follows

First I bequeath after all my just debts are
paid: to my black girls (vis) Easter Lethe
Mariah and Harriett all the property herein
after mentioned  All my land to be rented
until it Can be Sold and the interest to be paid
as well as the interest arising from the money
got for the land after it is Sold to the black
girls aforesaid Second I bequeath to the black
girls above named half of the Crop in the ground
at the time of my decease and also Loom and
tackling--a Cow--one back oven--brass Kettle--
tea Kettle Smoothing Irons and all their own beds &
bedding and Kitchen furniture except the three big
Kettles two bake ovens and one pot
Third I bequeath to the above named black
girls the interest of my personal estate after it is Sold
Fourth I bequeath to my girl Lethe a Sow and
pigs also a sow and eight pigs-- Also Sugar tongs
and six silver tea spoons to Harriet another of my girls
Fifth I hereby will and ordain my black girls (viz)
Lethe Harriet Easter and Mariah free at my death
Fifth After the death of my girls before mentioned
the money remaining in the hands of my Exec
=utors I devise to be paid to Alpheus Beal Willi
=ams my Nephew of Montgmery County Ma
=ryland I wish my Executors to have my prop
=erty Sold at a reasonable credit and they are
hereby empowered to execute all the parts of this
my last will and testament

I hereby appoint Zachariah Jacobs
of Wheeling Virginia my Sole Executor of
this my last will and testament Witness
my hand and Seal this twenty eighth day of
June one thousand eight hundred & thirty then
and thirty three Alpheus Beall (Seal)
Witness
Samuel McKeehan
John Stroop
Benjamin Stroop
At a court held for Ohio County on the fifth
day of August 1833
The last will & Testament of Alpheus Beall
deceased is presented in Court and proved by
the oaths of John Stroop & Benjamin Stroop
Two of the Subscribing witnesses thereto
and ordered to be recorded
A Copy Test Jno McColloch  Clk"



[Source: Ohio County, West Virginia, Will Books, V. 03 1828-1854, 98, will of Alpheus Beal; online images, Family Search (www.familysearch.org : accessed 3 October 2011), image 80.]

© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Resolved: To Be a Better Ancestor!

As genealogists and family historians, we appreciate ALL our ancestors. But nothing makes us happier than ancestors who left records of their lives—photographs, letters, diaries—so that we can know them in a personal way that is not possible from other records.

Think about a hundred years from now...it’s 2111...what artifacts will your descendants have from which to know you?

For Ancestor Appreciation Day, I’m making a resolution to be a better ancestor! Next month is Family History Month, and each week I’ll be working on, and sharing with you, what I’m doing to create and preserve a legacy for my descendants.

 I hope you’ll join me on the journey!

Image: africa / FreeDigitalPhotos.net



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Workday Wednesday - The United States Postal Service

1847 5-cent stamp depicting Benjamin Franklin, First U.S. Postmaster General,
appointed by the Continental Congress on 26 Sept 1789.
Public domain image from Wikimedia Commons.

Have you checked out NARA Microfilm Publication M841 Record of Appointments of Postmasters, 1832-September 30, 1971 to see if any of your ancestors served as postmaster?

Jean Wilcox Hibben of Circlemending has written an excellent series of blog posts exploring these records and describing the types of information that can be found. Click here for the first post which provides an overview of the record group, where to find the microfilms, etc.

I have discovered two ancestors who served as postmasters:
  • My great-grandfather Ambrose B. Martindale was appointed postmaster at Carmona, Polk County, Texas, on 16 February 1894. [Source: Jim Wheat, Postmasters & Post Offices of Polk County, Texas, 1847-1930 (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txpost/polk.html : accessed 28 May 2010), Ambrose B. Martindale, 16 Feb 1894.]
  • My 2nd great-granduncle Arad W. Franklin was appointed postmaster at Ostrander, Delaware County, Ohio, on 13 April 1893. [Source: "Postmasters 1842-2003," Delaware County, Ohio, Ostrander and Scioto Township History (http://www.ostscioto.com/Post%20Office.htm : accessed 20 Sept 2011), Arad W. Franklin, 13 April 1893.]
More recently, my uncle, William H. Yawman, worked for the post office (not sure in what capacity) and my sister is a postal clerk in Denton, Texas.



© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Tuesday's Tip - MOMS

If you're looking for marriages in Minnesota, MOMS is your one-stop shop!

The Minnesota Online Marriage System is designed to provide the general public with a tool to search for official marriage records and then direct the searcher to the county that holds the marriage document. All 87 counties participate in the project. A list of dates covered by county is available.

Old Dakota County, Minnesota, Courthouse, now
Hastings City Hall
Public domain image from Wikimedia Commons.




© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Thursday, September 15, 2011

And the Winner is.......


Kristin

For the Workday Wednesday Challenge posted last week, Kristin wrote about the occupations of her paternal great-grandfather, Lewis Cleage.

For participating in the challenge, honorable mention goes to these bloggers:


Sierra at Up In The Tree

Take a few minutes to read these posts about what they learned from the census about their ancestors' livelihoods!


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

A New FREE Educational Opportunity - The US-REC Study Group

Over the last several weeks, you may have seen references to a new educational opportunity available for FREE! Thanks to Valerie Brown Elkins of Family Cherished and Tonia Kendrick of Tonia's Roots, we now have the US-REC Study Group, focusing on American records.

With a concept similar to the successful ProGen Study Group, and using Facebook as the platform for discussion among the group members, it promises to be an outstanding way to learn more about the records that are available for U.S. research. The texts for the course are The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy by Val D. Greenwood and The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy by Loretta D.  Szucs and Sandra H. Luebking.

Designed for intermediate-level genealogists, the group will study two chapters each month and have a related practical assignment. The program will last approximately 15 months.

The US-REC Study Group still has a few spaces left in this first group of participants, but if you are interested, send me an email and I'll ask for information to be sent!

I'm looking forward to participating in this group and I hope you'll join me!


© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research

Friday, September 9, 2011

My 99 Genealogy Things Meme

Okay, I’m jumping on this bandwagon. I have read several posts on the 99 Things Meme, some general and some related to genealogy, so I’m not sure whose list I’m using here. I’ve added extra information (in blue) because I think this is a great way to get to know other genealogists! Come on, join the fun in your own post!

The list is annotated in the following manner:
Things I’ve already done: bold face type
Things I’d like to do: italicize
Things I haven’t done, don’t care to, or just hasn’t come up yet: plain type

  1. Belong to a genealogical society. National Genealogical Society, Southern California Genealogical Society, Utah Genealogical Association, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Association of Professional Genealogists
  2. Researched records onsite at a court house. In Los Angeles County, CA, Nacogdoches County and Sherman County in TX.
  3. Transcribed records. And have a lot more to transcribe!
  4. Uploaded tombstone pictures to Find-A-Grave. And created 2 virtual cemeteries. Also posted photos on 1BillionGraves.
  5. Documented ancestors for four generations (self, parents, grandparents, great-grandparents). Great-grandparent surnames: SPURLOCK, OWENS, MARTINDALE, FORSHEE, YAWMAN, BURTON, SNIDER, FRANKLIN.
  6. Joined Facebook. Yep, won’t you be my friend? facebook.com/denise.spurlock
  7. Cleaned up a run-down cemetery.
  8. Joined the GeneaBloggers Group.
  9. Attended a genealogy conference. NGS (2010, 2011); SCGS Jamboree (2010, 2011)
  10. Lectured at a genealogy conference.
  11. Spoke on a genealogy topic at a local genealogy society. One so far, have three more scheduled.
  12. Been the editor of a genealogy society newsletter. Yes, if you count the newsletter for the Southern California Chapter of APG.
  13. Contributed to a genealogy society publication.
  14. Served on the board or as an officer of a genealogy society. Same as 12.
  15. Got lost on the way to a cemetery. My sister is not always the best navigator!
  16. Talked to dead ancestors.
  17. Researched outside the state in which I live. Yes, in Louisiana and Texas.
  18. Knocked on the door of an ancestral home and visited with the current occupants.
  19. Cold called a distant relative.
  20. Posted messages on a surname message board. Many times.
  21. Uploaded a gedcom file to the internet. To WorldConnect, Ancestry, WikiTree.
  22. Googled my name. I have a Google alert set up!
  23. Performed a random act of genealogical kindness.
  24. Researched a non-related family, just for the fun of it.
  25. Have been paid to do genealogical research. Yes.
  26. Earn a living (majority of income) from genealogical research. Trying!
  27. Wrote a letter (or email) to a previously unknown relative. Wasn’t sure they were related until after writing to them.
  28. Contributed to one of the genealogy carnivals.
  29. Responded to messages on a message board. Many times.
  30. Was injured while on a genealogy excursion. Slipped and fell in a cemetery; only my pride was injured!
  31. Participated in a genealogy meme. Regularly.
  32. Created family history gift items (calendars, cookbooks, etc.).
  33. Performed a record lookup.
  34. Took a genealogy seminar cruise. Would be a lovely vacation!
  35. Am convinced that a relative must have arrived here from outer space. The southern U.S. seems to be a favorite landing area for UFOs.
  36. Found a disturbing family secret. Umm, sort of.
  37. Told others about a disturbing family secret. Of course!
  38. Combined genealogy with crafts (family picture quilt, scrapbooking).
  39. Think genealogy is a passion not a hobby. My name is Denise, and I’m a geneaholic....
  40. Assisted finding next of kin for a deceased person (Unclaimed Persons). An activity definitely worthy of one’s time.
  41. Taught someone else how to find their roots.
  42. Lost valuable genealogy data due to a computer crash or hard drive failure. Let’s not talk it...
  43. Been overwhelmed by available genealogy technology.
  44. Know a cousin of the 4th degree or higher. If you count someone you’ve only met online.
  45. Disproved a family myth through research.
  46. Got a family member to let you copy photos. Need to work on some others!
  47. Used a digital camera to “copy” photos or records. But now I have a FlipPal Mobile Scanner!
  48. Translated a record from a foreign language. Using Google Translate.
  49. Found an immigrant ancestor’s passenger arrival record. My son’s Italian great-grandfather.
  50. Looked at census records on microfilm, not on the computer. Line by line.
  51. Used microfiche.
  52. Visited the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Several times; visiting again in October.
  53. Visited more than one LDS Family History Center. Two: LA and Upland, CA.
  54. Visited a church or place of worship of one of your ancestors.
  55. Taught a class in genealogy.
  56. Traced ancestors back to the 18th Century.
  57. Traced ancestors back to the 17th Century.
  58. Traced ancestors back to the 16th Century.
  59. Can name all of your great-great-grandparents. Yes, add the following surnames to 5. above: VICKERS, HAMMONTREE, EATON, PARKER, SITTERLY, PARSONS, CALDWELL, CARY.
  60. Found an ancestor’s Social Security application. Have SS-5s for parents.
  61. Know how to determine a soundex code without the help of a computer.  
  62. Used Steve Morse’s One-Step searches. Occasionally.
  63. Own a copy of Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills. Can’t cite without it!
  64. Helped someone find an ancestor using records you had never used for your own research.
  65. Visited the main National Archives building in Washington, DC.
  66. Visited the Library of Congress. I still have my reader card from a visit in the 1990s!
  67. Have an ancestor who came over on the Mayflower. James Chilton.
  68. Have an ancestor who fought in the Civil War. Several, on both sides.
  69. Taken a photograph of an ancestor’s tombstone. Yep!
  70. Became a member of the Association of Graveyard Rabbits.
  71. Can read a church record in Latin.
  72. Have an ancestor who changed their name.
  73. Joined a Rootsweb mailing list. Two or three.
  74. Created a family website.
  75. Have more than one "genealogy" blog. Three!
  76. Was overwhelmed by the amount of family information received from someone.
  77. Have broken through at least one brick wall.
  78. Visited the DAR Library in Washington D.C.
  79. Borrowed microfilm from the Family History Library through a local Family History Center. But hate the wait.
  80. Have done indexing for Family Search Indexing or another genealogy project. Family Search and Ancestry.
  81. Visited the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
  82. Had an amazing serendipitous find of the "Psychic Roots" variety.
  83. Have an ancestor who was a Patriot in the American Revolutionary War. Several.
  84. Have an ancestor who was a Loyalist in the American Revolutionary War.
  85. Have both Patriot & Loyalist ancestors.
  86. Have used Border Crossing records to locate an ancestor. But not often....
  87. Use maps in my genealogy research. I love maps!
  88. Have a convict ancestor who was transported from the UK.
  89. Found a bigamist amongst the ancestors. Maybe, not sure yet!
  90. Visited the National Archives in Kew.
  91. Visited St. Catherine's House in London to find family records.
  92. Found a cousin in Australia (or other foreign country).
  93. Consistently cite my sources. Yes.
  94. Visited a foreign country (i.e. one I don't live in) in search of ancestors.
  95. Can locate any document in my research files within a few minutes. In my dreams..
  96. Have an ancestor who was married four times (or more).
  97. Made a rubbing of an ancestors gravestone.
  98. Organized a family reunion.
  99. Published a family history book (on one of my families). Yes, but it needs revision.

© 2011 Denise Spurlock, Ancestral Trees Research